Ramblings & ephemera

Vista & Mac OS X security features

From Prince McLean’s “Pwn2Own contest winner: Macs are safer than Windows” (AppleInsider: 26 March 2009):

Once it did arrive, Vista introduced sophisticated new measures to make it more difficult for malicious crackers to inject code.

One is support for the CPU’s NX bit, which allows a process to mark certain areas of memory as “Non-eXecutable” so the CPU will not run any code stored there. This is referred to as “executable space protection,” and helps to prevent malicious code from being surreptitiously loaded into a program’s data storage and subsequently executed to gain access to the same privileges as the program itself, an exploit known as a “buffer overflow attack.”

A second security practice of Vista is “address space layout randomization” or ASLR, which is used to load executables, and the system libraries, heap, and stack into a randomly assigned location within the address space, making it far more difficult for crackers to know where to find vulnerabilities they can attack, even if they know what the bugs are and how to exploit them.

[Charlie Miller, the security expert who won both this and last year’s CanSecWest Pwn2Own security contests,] told Tom’s Hardware “the NX bit is very powerful. When used properly, it ensures that user-supplied code cannot be executed in the process during exploitation. Researchers (and hackers) have struggled with ways around this protection. ASLR is also very tough to defeat. This is the way the process randomizes the location of code in a process. Between these two hurdles, no one knows how to execute arbitrary code in Firefox or IE 8 in Vista right now. For the record, Leopard has neither of these features, at least implemented effectively. In the exploit I won Pwn2Own with, I knew right where my shellcode was located and I knew it would execute on the heap for me.”

While Apple did implement some support for NX and ASLR in Mac OS X, Leopard retains dyld, (the dynamic loader responsible for loading all of the frameworks, dylibs, and bundles needed by a process) in the same known location, making it relatively trivial to bypass its ASLR. This is slated to change later this year in Snow Leopard.

With the much larger address space available to 64-bit binaries, Snow Leopard’s ASLR will make it possible to hide the location of loaded code like a needle in a haystack, thwarting the efforts of malicious attackers to maintain predictable targets for controlling the code and data loaded into memory. Without knowing what addresses to target, the “vast majority of these exploits will fail,” another security expert who has also won a high profile Mac cracking contest explained to AppleInsider.

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